Read Tokyo to Tijuana: Gabriele Departing America by Steven David Justin Sills Free Online


Ebook Tokyo to Tijuana: Gabriele Departing America by Steven David Justin Sills read! Book Title: Tokyo to Tijuana: Gabriele Departing America
The author of the book: Steven David Justin Sills
Edition: Alcibiades Press
Date of issue: March 31st 2012
ISBN: 1475116241
ISBN 13: 9781475116243
Language: English
Format files: PDF
The size of the: 984 KB
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Reader ratings: 3.8

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This story contrasts the lives of two people: Gabriele and Sang Huin in their search for finding their place in society without sacrificing individual liberty Papyrus: An Eloquent Ode to Life's Many Gritty Moments by Amy L. Wilson Arkansas Gazette Little Rock, Arkansas April 1990 (note: concerning the print edition by the New Poets Series printed in 1990) An American Papyrus Steven Sills The Chestnut Hills Press Poetry Series 63 pages; $6.95 paperback Twenty-six poems make up this first published book by Steven Sills, 26, of Fayetteville. Sills' vision is often a dark one. He writes of the homeless, the abused, the forgotten people. He is also intrigued with the mystical, the sensual, loss--as in losing those whom we hold dear, such as a spouse or lover--as well as the lost, such as someone who is autistic, who seems unreachable. Sills' skillful use of the language to impart the telling moments of a life is his strength. He chooses his words carefully, employing a well-developed vocabulary. He is thoughtful about punctuation, where to break lines and when to make a new stanza. He's obviously well versed in "great" literature. Sills' command of language helps to soften the blows of some of the seemier passages found in his poems. Seamy may not be the best word to use. Perhaps gritty is a better word or just plain matter-of-fact and to the point, as in this descriptive passage from "Oracion A Traves De Gass," about the hopeless feelings of a respiratory therapy worker: "With the last of the air drawing in/ Begins to fold its walls; and he could imagine it/ Like he could imagine from unexact memories/ The woman last night at the hospital, whom he began to like---/ Her body pulling cell by cell/ Apart before he had a chance to finish the rescue with the hose." The book begins with "Post-Annulment2" a poem with a poignant description of society's displaced--"As the sun blazes upon the terminal's/ Scraped concrete/The shelved rows of the poor men"--and continues by describing a city scene through the eyes of a maintenence worker at the Hilton Hotel. The protagonist's wife has left him and he is taking the bus to work that morning, his mind wandering as he looks for the key to why she is gone. "He rings the bell. / The idea of her not home and legally annuled/ From his life--her small crotch not tightened to his desperate thrusts/ Makes him feel sick. He gets down from the bus./ He goes to work. He suddenly knows that he is not in love." As many poets will do, Sills could not leave this work alone. So a hybrid of this poem, "Post-Annulment" ends the book. In it, he has kept many of the original lines and added parenthetical remarks to expand on his ideas. It is in this context he allows himself to comment on religion: "Religion is a lie! Everything is a lie!" and on marriage: "Marriage, that santified legal rape, fosters the child-man to be a destined societal function as he grows up in the family unit." Not all of the poems are so bleak and cynical in every passage, however, as is apparent in "The San Franciscan's Night Meditations": "The night is full of impulses to live and run and seep heavily into its dark robes of silence and morbid rightness." People who do not feel comfortable examining in detail the darker side of life--the the details that the average person overlooks because it just hurts or feels to strange to look--will not enjoy this book. Serious writers of free verse, contemporary poetry and/or those who study it will not be disappointed. Sills, a native of Missouri, is a recent graduate of Southwest Missouri State University in Springfield. He currently is working in Fayetteville. Sills dedicated his book to Mike Burns, a poet and teacher at SMSU who helped him edit his work.


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Ebook Tokyo to Tijuana: Gabriele Departing America read Online! Contact me at poetinasia@gmail.com.
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Reviews and appraisals

*From Dr Corum, thesis advisor
Steven, you should DEFINITELY continue to give your life to . . . literary novels (notice I omitted “obscure”).  What you have produced is a phenomenal work.  Others, in the past, have attempted to do something like you have done, but they did not come close to creating a work with such breadth and depth as you.

 

I apologize for taking so very long to complete the reading of your work, but it is very densely written in some sections, while others seem to be as lucid as anything I have ever read.  Your vocabulary probably exceeds my own (“fulgurant”), for which I am thankful, as I always enjoy being taught the existence of words I have not yet incorporated into my own lexicon.

The most successful parts of your work—for me—were the interactions between Luk, Aus, and the central character, as those passages moved the story along.  I think using the unrest and waging of police action in Bangkok sets up the intellectual discontent in the rest of the novel, but I would wish for a more balanced unfolding of the story with the intellectual ruminations.  The least successful passages for me were sometimes extremely lengthy sentences—see the first page of Chapter 20, for example—which contained so many parenthetical expressions that I would lose the train of thought.

But, on the whole, you have included all of the needed requirements of the Graduate School, and you have included, it seems, allusions to all of the major texts of the whole program, including some of your own choice that I would love to see taught (or maybe not) in our program: Look Homeward Angel, The Way of All Flesh, Donne’s poetry, Gorky’s My Childhood, and the work of Thomas Hardy, Ibsen, O’Neill, and Will Durant and that of John Dos Passos, whom I had the pleasure of meeting in 1969 (I still have an autographed copy of his Midcentury), not to mention, of course, the philosophers.

So . . . congratulations on completing your major task for the program.  I will be posting final grades shortly.  Let me know if you have questions or comments.

Thanks,
Everett E. Corum, Ph.D. | Director of Humanities, Philosophy, Religion and World Languages Programs

American Public University System
American Military University  |  American Public University
111 W. Congress Street, Charles Town, WV 25414

*From the Arkansas GazetteAn Eloquent Ode to Life's Many Gritty Moments by Amy L. Wilson Arkansas Gazette Little Rock, Arkansas April 1990 (note: concerning the print edition by the New Poets Series printed in 1990) An American Papyrus Steven Sills The Chestnut Hills Press Poetry Series 63 pages; $6.95 paperback Twenty-six poems make up this first published book by Steven Sills, 26, of Fayetteville. Sills' vision is often a dark one. He writes of the homeless, the abused, the forgotten people. He is also intrigued with the mystical, the sensual, loss--as in losing those whom we hold dear, such as a spouse or lover--as well as the lost, such as someone who is autistic, who seems unreachable. Sills' skillful use of the language to impart the telling moments of a life is his strength. He chooses his words carefully, employing a well-developed vocabulary. He is thoughtful about punctuation, where to break lines and when to make a new stanza. He's obviously well versed in "great" literature. Sills' command of language helps to soften the blows of some of the seemier passages found in his poems. Seamy may not be the best word to use. Perhaps gritty is a better word or just plain matter-of-fact and to the point, as in this descriptive passage from "Oracion A Traves De Gass," about the hopeless feelings of a respiratory therapy worker: "With the last of the air drawing in/ Begins to fold its walls; and he could imagine it/ Like he could imagine from unexact memories/ The woman last night at the hospital, whom he began to like---/ Her b


Reviews of the Tokyo to Tijuana: Gabriele Departing America


WILLIAM

The beginning is exciting, but at the end of the book is just a very template.

MICHAEL

Quickly downloaded

LACEY

After this book, I look at the world with different eyes!

ALEXANDER

One of my favorite

NIAMH

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